menopausebarbees
... the tales of two sisters

Dana lives in Seattle, and Tracie lives in Germany. We are businesswomen, writers and humorists. We write about life, dating, and today's modern women.

A Flicker of Promise in Incompatible with Nature

It feels like summer and it takes me back to a time when destiny would alter my life plans. Where was I? Read it here in Chapter 8 , A Flicker of Promise today at menoparebarbees today. The sun is shining, people are leaving and some are arriving for vacation. Reminds me of that one moment in time in my book, Incompatible with Nature’s–A Mother’s Story and how  destiny can can change your life…on a vacation. Enjoy everyone.

Bare feet. Warm sand. Palm fringed beaches. Puerto Vallarta.

Though the beachfront restaurant was comfortably crowded, my girlfriend and I spotted a free table not far from the water’s edge and moseyed on over. I didn’t have a care in the world while we waited on our orders, laughing and rehashing all the events of the past two days when suddenly I looked up directly into his face. Did a double take. He likes to say that I winked at him. I could swear it was just the sun in my eyes. He was in a cluster of guys, each of whom had sprawled himself picture postcard perfect in the sand or in one of the low backed sun chairs belonging to the adjacent beachside bar. In between their trying to get our attention and my girlfriend and I chattering away, he and I made eyes with each other. Penetrating glances where time stopped. Again and again. Something was going to happen….Read mote at www.menopausebarbees,com

 

A Flicker of Promise

Just as mysteriously as Marc’s swelling started, it stopped. As I raced onto   the first floor of the hospital, one of the station nurses smiled and pointed me in the direction of the ward. There he was taking his bo@le in the arms of a nurse. I threw on the mandatory green dressing gown and took over the feeding. I was thrilled down to my very bones.

Helmut came up sometime later that morning. He just couldn’t believe it. Our son looked like our son again. I was convinced that this was a direct sign from God and an indication of our son’s fighting spirit. We met the Professor in his office. He didn’t agree with me.

“I don’t know what the swelling meant or why it is gone,” he said. “But it doesn’t change anything.”

“But he’s eating and acting normal again,” I said.
“It won’t last,” he said. “It’s not possible.”
His eyes didn’t hold even the tiniest flicker of

promise. Moored so firmly to his position, he sucked the wind right out of my sails. To all my intents and purposes, dragging out this conversation would be a wasted effort. He clearly was not inclined towards saying anything I wanted to hear. And likewise, he

knew that I didn’t want to hear anything he had to say. The ba@le line had been drawn. And each breath Marc took deepened it and lengthened it and made it wider. I clung to the fact that as long as my baby was alive I would be on a mission. I could not afford to sit on the sidelines and I would not. As far as I was concerned, the Professor needed to get some team spirit.

Pinching the bridge of my nose, trying somewhat successfully to stop myself from crying, I quietly stood, excused myself from his office and headed back to Marc.

Deflated but not defeated. I had hope because my son was alive.

What else was there?

Helmut had gone back to work. I leaned back into the hardness of the chair placed next to Marc’s bed and rested my hand on top of the crib coverlet somewhere near his feet as he slept. My gaze drifted beyond the windowpanes to that point where the horizon melted into the sky…

Bare feet. Warm sand. Palm-fringed beaches. Puerto Vallarta.

Though the beachfront restaurant was comfortably crowded, my girlfriend and I spo@ed a free table not far from the water’s edge and moseyed on over. I didn’t have a care in the world while we waited on our orders, laughing and rehashing all the events of the past two

days when suddenly I looked up directly into his face. Did a double take. He likes to say that I winked at him. I could swear it was just the sun in my eyes.

He was in a cluster of guys, each of whom had sprawled himself picture-postcard perfect in the sand or in one of the low-backed sun chairs belonging to the adjacent beachside bar. In between their trying to get our a@ention and my girlfriend and I cha@ering away, he and I made eyes with each other. Penetrating glances where time stopped. Again and again. Something was going to happen. I knew it.

He headed towards me. I scooted up and sat perched on the edge of my chair, smiling in his direction, my arms folded across each other on the table. Aside from the blue in his midnight blue bikini swim trunks, he was golden, from head to foot. With the last step of his approach he eased himself into bent knee alongside me. He crouched so close we could’ve touched toes if we dared.

In halting English he said, “Hi. My name is Helmut.” “Hi, I’m Tracie. Where are you from?”
“I am from Germany, and you?”
“My girlfriend and I are from Sea@le, Washington.

We’re on the northwest coast of America, neighbors with Canada,” I said, positioning my hands in the air on an invisible map indicating the positions of the states along the west coast of America. He stayed about ten minutes and we made that sort of conversation people make when they first meet each other. And want to see each other again. Only we spoke slower and used our limbs a lot. His buddies began ribbing him from across the way. They didn’t believe he’d have the nerve to come over to our table. He chuckled and threw a glance their way over his shoulder. He looked back to me and our giggles were tinged a soft shade of crimson in the sunlight.

“Tonight you meet me?” he said. His eyes shimmered gold and green and brown.

“Well, we’re invited to a party and –”

“Before the party we meet at Carlos O’Brian’s disco. Eight o’clock?” he said.

“Okay, I’ll meet you there.” I said.

He reluctantly stood to leave and our eyes feverishly held fast.

That night he spo@ed my girlfriend and me on the ragged edges of the forefront of the line outside the disco that had no end in sight. He maneuvered his way between the throng of people and pulled us inside. We made our way to his table, one of what seemed like hundreds stretching from here to there packed with party people. His arm enveloped my waist before we sat down. The club photographer captured our kilowa@ smiles. Somehow, we se@led into our own li@le pocket of conversation. We would meet later that evening at another club.

The wee hours of the morning saw him pull me tight into his arms in the middle of the dance floor. “Now you stay with me,” he said.

And we danced and danced and by the time the sun had risen…

“Frau Mayer…Frau May—”
I snapped my head to a@ention.
“Es ist Zeit,” (“It’s time”), the nurse said handing me

the thermometer. Embarrassed, yet somewhat annoyed that I’d been disturbed, I nonetheless smiled up at her.

“Thank you,” I said, hoping that I didn’t look a fool lost in my private dream in this public place. Time to take Marc’s temperature. I laid the thermometer on a towel near where he lay. I would wait just a li@le longer; he would soon stir.

And in German:

 Ein paar liebe Worte

Auf demselben mysteriösen Weg, wie Marcs Schwellung aufgetre-ten war, verschwand sie wieder. Auf meinem Sprint hoch in den ersten Stock des Krankenhauses lächelte mich eine der Stations-schwestern an und deutete in Richtung des Krankensaals. Da warMarc. Er lag in den Armen einer Krankenschwester und nuckeltean seinem Fläschchen. Ich streifte mir den obligatorischen grünen Kittel über und nahm der Schwester das Füttern ab. Ich war durchund durch begeistert.

Helmut kam irgendwann später an diesem Morgen. Er konntees einfach nicht glauben. Unser Sohn sah wieder wie unser Sohn aus. Ich war überzeugt, dass es sich dabei um ein unmittelbares Zeichen von Gott handelte und einen Hinweis auf den kämpferi- schen Geist unseres Sohnes. Wir trafen den Professor in seinem Arztzimmer. Er wollte mir nicht beipflichten.

»Ich weiß nicht, was diese Schwellung war oder warum sie wieder verschwunden ist«, sagte er. »Aber das ändert nichts.«

»Aber er isst und verhält sich wieder ganz normal«, entgegneteich.

»Das wird nicht anhalten«, sagte er. »Unmöglich.«

Seine Augen versprühten noch nicht einmal den kleinsten Funken eines Zuspruchs. So fest in seiner Position verankert, nahm er mir sofort den Wind aus den Segeln. Es wäre in jeder Hinsicht vergeudete Liebesmühe. Er war definitiv nicht gewillt,das zu sagen, was ich hören wollte. Umgekehrt wusste er, dass ichnichts von dem hören wollte, was er zu sagen hatte. Die Fronten waren geklärt. Und mit jedem Atemzug, den Marc nahm, wurdeder Graben zwischen dem Professor und mir tiefer und länger und breiter. Ich klammerte mich an die Tatsache, dass ich, solange mein Baby lebte, eine Mission zu erfüllen hatte. Ich konnte es mir nichtleisten, teilnahmslos am Spielfeldrand zu sitzen, und ich würde es nicht tun. Wenn es nach mir ginge, gehörte dem Professor ein bisschen Mannschaftsgeist eingehaucht.

Ich kniff mir mit Daumen und Zeigefinger in die Nasenwurzel und versuchte, einigermaßen erfolgreich, meine Tränen zu unter- drücken. Ich stand leise auf, bat darum, mir nachzusehen, dass ichnun das Zimmer verlassen würde, und ging zurück zu Marc. Ich war vielleicht müde, aber nicht geschlagen. Ich hatte Hoffnung, weil mein Sohn lebte. Was konnte wichtiger sein?

Helmut war zurück zur Arbeit gegangen. Ich lehnte mich zurückin den harten Stuhl, der an Marcs Bettchen stand. Er schlief. Ichlegte meine Hand auf die Decke, irgendwo neben seine Füßchen,und ließ meinen Blick zum Fenster schweifen, durch das Glas hindurch, zu dem Punkt dort draußen, wo der Horizont mit dem Himmel verschmolz. Ich dachte an Mexiko.

Barfuß. Warmer Sand. Palmengesäumte Strände. Puerto Vallarta.Obwohl das Strandrestaurant gut besucht war, entdeckten meine Freundin Valerie und ich einen freien Tisch nicht weit vom Meeresufer und schlenderten gemütlich hin. Ich war völlig sorgen- frei, während wir dort saßen, auf unsere Bestellung warteten undlachend die Erlebnisse der letzten beiden Tage Revue passieren ließen. Als ich aufsah, blickte ich direkt in Helmuts Gesicht. Ich musste zweimal hinsehen. Er erzählt ja gern, dass ich ihm zuge- zwinkert hätte. Aber ich bin mir fast sicher, dass ich geblinzelt habe, weil mir die Sonne so in die Augen schien.

Er war Teil einer Gruppe von jungen Männern, die sich entwederim Sand räkelten oder in einem der Sonnenstühle ausstreckten, die zur angrenzenden Strandbar gehörten. Während die Jungs versuchten, unsere Aufmerksamkeit zu erwecken, schwatzten Valerie und ich munter weiter. Aber für Helmut und mich gab es nur uns beide. Wir machten uns gegenseitig schöne Augen. Die Zeit stand still. Eindringliche Blicke, immer und immer wieder. Etwas würde passieren. Ich wusste es.

Helmut kam auf mich zu. Ich rutschte in meinem Stuhl hoch und setzte mich kerzengerade auf die Kante, lächelte in seine Richtung, meine Arme hatte ich vor mir auf dem Tisch übereinandergelegt. Bis auf den dunklen Streifen seiner mitternachtsblauen Badehosewar er golden von Kopf bis Fuß. Mit dem letzten Schritt auf michzu beugte er geschmeidig seine Knie und hockte sich neben mich.Er kam so nah, dass unsere Zehen sich berührt hätten, wenn wir es zugelassen hätten.

In stockendem Englisch sagte er: »Hi. Ich bin Helmut.«
»Hi. Ich bin Tracie. Woher kommst du?«
»Aus Deutschland. Und du?«
»Meine Freundin und ich sind aus Seattle, Washington. Das

liegt an der Nordwestküste der USA, neben Kanada«, sagte ich und positionierte meine Hände auf einer imaginären Landkarten in der Luft, wo ich ihm die verschiedenen Westküstestaaten einzeichne.

Er blieb etwa zehn Minuten bei mir sitzen und wir sprachen miteinander, wie Leute eben so miteinander sprechen, wenn sie sich zum ersten Mal treffen und sich wiedersehen wollen. Aberwir sprachen langsamer und machten viel Gebrauch von unserem Körper. Seine Kumpels begannen, ihn aus ein paar Metern Entfer- nung aufzuziehen. Sie hatten nicht geglaubt, dass er den Schneidaufbringen würde, zu unserem Tisch zu kommen. Er feixte und warf ihnen über seine Schulter hinweg einen Blick zu. Dann sah er zu mir zurück, und unsere kichernden Gesichter färbten sich im Licht der Sonne in ein sanftes Karmesinrot.

»Treffen wir uns heute Abend?«, fragte er. Seine Augen leuch- teten golden, grün und braun.

»Also, wir sind zu einer Party eingeladen und –«

»Vor der Party treffen wir uns in Carlos O’Brian’s Disco. 20:00 Uhr?«, fragte er.

»Okay, wir sehn uns dann dort«, sagte ich.

Zögerlich stand er auf, um zu gehen. Unsere Augen hielten fiebernd aneinander fest.

Am Abend erspähte er Valerie und mich an der umkämpften Spitze der endlos langen Schlange, die sich vor Carlos O’Brian’sgeformt hatte. Helmut manövrierte sich durch die Menschenmen-ge, schnappte uns und zog uns in den Club hinein. Wir schlugen uns zu seinem Tisch durch, einem von scheinbar hunderten, die vom einen Ende zum anderen des Clubs reichten und von Party- volk besetzt waren. Sein Arm umschlang meine Taille, bevor wiruns setzten. Der Hausfotograf fing unser strahlendes Lächeln ein. Irgendwie richteten wir uns auf unserer eigenen kleinen Gespräch-sinsel ein. Wir vereinbarten, uns später in einem anderen Club zu treffen.

In den frühen Morgenstunden, auf der Tanzfläche, zog er michan sich und schloss mich fest in seine Arme.

»Jetzt bleibst du bei mir«, sagte er.
Und wir tanzten und tanzten, und als die Sonne aufging …

»Frau Mayer. Frau May –«
Mein Kopf schnellte hoch.
»Es ist Zeit«, sagte die Krankenschwester und gab mir das

Thermometer.
Peinlich berührt und auch etwas genervt, weil sie mich gestört

hatte, lächelte ich sie an.
»Danke«, sagte ich und hoffte, dass ich mich nicht lächerlich

gemacht hatte, weil ich in meinen privaten Träumen versunken in einem öffentlichen Raum gesessen hatte.

Es war Zeit, Fieber zu messen. Ich legte das Thermometer auf ein Handtuch neben Marc. Ich würde noch ein bisschen warten. Er würde sich gleich rühren.